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Jeremy Branson, the son of fallen hero, Officer James Branson, Jr., EOW 3/9/03, is about to start his senior year at Saint Louis University. Jeremy is majoring in Psychology with a minor in African Studies and pre-law. Upon graduation, he plans to attend the Howard University School of Law. Jeremy recently went on an eye-opening tour over spring break. When we picture a college spring break, most of us think of a non-stop party. Jeremy and some fellow students spent their break in a much different manner.

Every year since 2015, students at Saint Louis University are invited to embark upon an incredible journey. Over spring break, students travel to various landmarks that were instrumental in the modern civil rights movement. The group visited 14 of these historic locations, including the National Civil Rights Museum, the Rosa Parks Museum, the Southern Poverty Law Center, and the Slavery Museum.

When asked to describe the trip, Jeremy said, “The experience was a great opportunity for me to learn, grow, and understand the history that shaped the lives of African Americans today. From the moment I left the campus of Saint Louis University, I was filled with joy and aspiration. The trip attendees were very diverse, so I got a chance to see how my history is appreciated from those who do not look like me.”

Speaking about the most memorable part of the tour, Jeremy says, “The trip was full of surprises, and in Selma was probably where I had the most fun, where we did a slave simulation taking us from the coast of Africa down the middle passage to the West Indies and Virginia. The students had no idea that this was going to happen, and it was very hands on. When we arrived at the facility, our tour guide began yelling at us, ‘Line up! Men on the right side and women on the left!’ We were treated as if we were slaves. The feelings of hopelessness and uncertainty that overtook me was sobering. Even as a simulation that I knew was staged, it still resonated deeply with me. I began to empathize and sympathize, and I became pensive when I thought of how much harsher this was for my ancestors. The spontaneity of this experience took me to a place mentally that I greatly appreciated. Besides not being dressed as such, I did feel, slightly, the mental state of a slave. The experience gave me all I was hoping for and more”.

The fight for equality is something Jeremy plans to continue to champion on the SLU campus. Jeremy will serve as the President of the African American Society at SLU for the 2017/2018 school year. He plans “to be an activist while learning about others and their struggles”.

When asked what he wished people knew about The BackStoppers, Jeremy told us, “This organization has been very key in my life. From the fall of my father, you guys stepped in and made sure that my mother, my siblings, and I were well taken care of. I cannot thank you enough for your recognition of us and my father. This organization thrives on donations from individuals who care and who understand. I appreciate that my dad’s legacy lives on considering everything that BackStoppers does. He will truly never be forgotten, and I will do everything I can to make sure that I do my part in The BackStoppers organization”.

We would like to greatly thank Jeremy for sharing his experiences with us! Good luck with all your future endeavors. We are so proud of all you have accomplished and look forward to all your future holds.

The BackStoppers Education Fund ensures that children of fallen first responders will have access to financial resources to pursue educational opportunities, making experiences such as Jeremy Branson’s at St. Louis University possible. We have made a commitment on behalf of the entire community to provide for the future security and education of the families we serve.

 

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